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Some boring anodizing stuff

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  • Some boring anodizing stuff

    Thought I would post some stuff, since there seems to be a lot of interest.
    Finishing up a few jobs that have been delayed with my move and workshop build...
    I'm all self taught with this, and decided to take it on a few years back. I've always been mechanically inclined. I've invested a lot of spare time in research, money into proper equipment and supplies, and A LOT of trial and error.
    Anodizing only works on aluminum and titanium, that why anything in the acid bath on the anode side is one of these metals, and why not all aluminum is equal, why parts will exhibit different colors (as you all have seen with the old, original green Redfields).
    What anodizing does is build up a porous layer, and then it sucks up dye like a easter egg.
    Parts on the left are anodized, right are base metal.





  • #2
    Temperatures are of the utmost importance. Too hot of an acid bath, and you're left with an anodic layer that will wipe off with your finger. It also produces blotchy finishes.
    Too cold, and you won't get any type of layer without very high voltages, and very poor color absorbsion.

    Too hot of a dye bath, and you'll seal your anodic layer before it can absorb dye.
    Too cold of a dye bath, and smaller particles of the dye (lets say the blue of a green dye) will be absorbed first resulting in a colors that are not correct.
    Green dye is black on a napkin.
    Black dye is purple on a napkin.
    The biggest mistake rookies make is producing a dye that looks green, and then getting a blue part from it.

    Comment


    • Sandymac21
      Sandymac21 commented
      Editing a comment
      Is the acid bath temperature a constant?
      And are somethings dipped longer than others?eg,a buttplate vs a scope tube

    • tokiwartooth
      tokiwartooth commented
      Editing a comment
      You have to stay between 65 - 75 degrees F. Also, 2 scopes will color COMPLETELY differently, depends on the alloy, strength of acid solution, voltage, etc. Nothing is constant or predictable, unfortunately. I get such a wide range of color variations, even on parts done together, perhaps even on a single part.
      Sometimes the forced oxidation achieves a great color, sometimes it gives me a horribly yellow part. Sometimes it does nothing.
      It's just the chaos of mother nature.
      I've been able to tighten up the color variation deviation range.
      Generally, the more amps I can push through, the faster a part will anodize, but I've found a slower anodic layer buildup provides more color consistency and depth. I would attribute that to longer, smaller diameter anodic tubules vs. short wide ones. As you pump more amps, the solution heats up faster and needs to be cooled. I generally start at 65 degrees, try and stay at 18 - 20 volts, 6 - 8 amps. Any higher and my wires start to melt.
      Last edited by tokiwartooth; 02-17-2016, 12:42 PM.

  • #3
    __________
    Last edited by BoltTrash; 11-06-2016, 01:22 AM.

    Comment


    • #4
      Keep it coming. Far from boring!! I love to see your craft, piece of arts!

      Comment


      • #5
        Toki,
        Click image for larger version

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        I couldn't be more pleased with the scope that you did for me....Thanks again.

        Comment


        • deltawiskey
          deltawiskey commented
          Editing a comment
          That's a Great looking rifle and scope!!
          DW

        • Capthook73
          Capthook73 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks. Toki did a great job on it. I have replaced the trigger with the correct double sear/ tombstone trigger courtesy of Game Warden....

      • #6
        Originally posted by Capthook73 View Post
        Toki,
        [ATTACH=CONFIG]n12631[/ATTACH] I couldn't be more pleased with the scope that you did for me....Thanks again.
        This is one of the best I've produced. There were 3 of them. Haven't been able to exactly reproduce this, even using the same process.

        Comment


        • SemperFi
          SemperFi commented
          Editing a comment
          I hope you noted the planetary alignment that day.

      • #7
        Not just his coloring work he also has the means to refurbish old scopes. I can vouch for Toki.

        Comment


        • #8
          I suppose you're not performing this service any more? Too bad, you really do them justice! PM me if you know of another member or shop willing to work on these scopes.

          DT

          Comment


          • #9
            Originally posted by dotrappe View Post
            I suppose you're not performing this service any more? Too bad, you really do them justice! PM me if you know of another member or shop willing to work on these scopes.

            DT
            I am, just waiting for a break in the action. Got 2 jobs left to finish, then I'll take the next batch.

            Comment

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