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Anyone have experience with a capacitive discharge welder?

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  • Anyone have experience with a capacitive discharge welder?

    Trying to find one that is cost effective to spot weld thin gauge aluminum wire to parts, for anodizing.
    Slowest part of the process is wiring up parts and making sure you have good electrical contact (and maintain as the part anodizes in the tank)
    and I've noticed these types of welders are used for tapping a wire against a part and it spot welds itself.
    I know with aluminum that there is instant oxidation, so you may have to introduce Argon or Nitrogen into the equation.
    I located a few welders, but man, they are just way too expensive ($800 - $1500) but notice the Chinese bargains on Ebay, but was wondering if they don't put out enough voltage (I think you need 30 volts for aluminum). Anyone have any experience with this stuff?

  • #2
    I once got bitten by a capacitive discharge ignition system (MSD). It felt like it welded my knees to the bumper and my elbows to the radiator support of my Mustang. Not sure it that helps you any...

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    • Stevo86
      Stevo86 commented
      Editing a comment
      I feel your pain... Did that with my Dodge Challenger.

  • #3
    So you're back now? Glad to see you here

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    • #4
      Ahh....finally a welding question....I can contribute with confidence.....I mainly deal with ASME Code welds.. high pressure piping and pressure vessels, but occasionally weld aluminum parts that require anodizing at the end of fabrication. I would not attempt any type of welding what so ever. If you use the GTAW (TIG) process, you stand the chance of blowing holes into it or seriously distorting the part. After you get past the welding part and anodizing, you will notice the welded anodized area will be lighter in color due to the mixing of different alloy's (base material and filler material). As far as RSW goes (spot welding). I don't reccomend that process either. You might experience some pitting after you remove the welded wire from your part or some deformation of the part. RSW relies on how much pressure and current are applied to your part to achieve a sound weld. I'm not saying you can't do it, but the time you buy the equipment to do everything setup..etc...or me typing this reply..lol.....you would have already wired up your part by hand and had no issues as described above. As far as equipment goes.....you get what you pay for...cheap foreign crap equals a shitty result in the end ( Buy AMERICAN MADE). If you want....give me all your specs of what your trying to weld and I will consult a welding engineer I work with. This fella worked for a major welding equipment company based out of Ohio (Lin--ln Elec--ic) for 20 plus years as a welding engineer before getting his current position now. He also gets killer discounts on equipment through his old employer...
      Last edited by Bildoe308; 04-03-2016, 07:52 PM.

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      • #5
        Toki,

        Im not sure what you overall experience with commercial anno is but I spend about $900K a year getting anno done so I have seen a lot of parts being racked..

        Have you looked into what the commercial guys use? I have had to pay for a number of custom racking solutions for some of out parts.

        Have a look at this link, I don't know if it will help or not.

        http://www.aluminumanodizingracks.com/racks.html

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        • #6
          I have experience with CD welders. We use them for holding samples during thermal spray.

          Where re I am now we don't have one so I can't give brands or specs, but they are expensive because they are marketed to the jewelry industry.

          Aldo, Bildoe is right- the color at the weld area will not match perfectly. Even with CD, unless the alloys are identical, typically trace of the electrode will be on the contact surface. Do it where it won't be seen if possible.

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          • #7
            Originally posted by Badgerord View Post
            Toki,

            Im not sure what you overall experience with commercial anno is but I spend about $900K a year getting anno done so I have seen a lot of parts being racked..

            Have you looked into what the commercial guys use? I have had to pay for a number of custom racking solutions for some of out parts.

            Have a look at this link, I don't know if it will help or not.

            http://www.aluminumanodizingracks.com/racks.html
            Problem with the racks is you have to etch them after every use, unless they are Titanium. Once they anodize (anything in the acid bath will anodize) they are no good, have to be etched to remove the anodizing.

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